Review: Boruto: Naruto the Movie

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Posted October 17, 2015 by in Action

Release Date: 7 August 2015
 
Synopsis: Boruto Uzumaki is the son of Naruto Uzumaki, the Seventh Hokage of the Hidden Leaf Village. Having heard stories of Naruto's deeds as a hero and struggling with his role as the Hokage's son, Boruto wishes to surpass his father. Following Sarada Uchiha, Boruto meets his father's friend, Sasuke Uchiha, and requests to be trained by him which takes Boruto on a journey he never expected.
 
Genre: , ,
 
Creators:
 
Voice Actors: , , , ,
 

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Lots of fan service, excellent fight animation
 

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Plot pacing, forgettable villains
 

Boruto: Naruto the movie delivers what fans want – an action packed, lovable movie with both soul and fan service moments everywhere!

Rating

Plot
8.0


Animation
9.0


Sound
7.5


Overall Direction
8.5


Total Score
8.3

8.3/ 10

by Richard Hoskins
Full Article
Boruto is both a movie and character that Naruto fans are sure to love – a great addition to the Naruto franchise

Boruto: Naruto the Movie is an enjoyable and action-packed addition to the Naruto franchise. Ushering in the next generation of characters, Boruto along with all the new additions serve as both fan service and interesting plot points that intertwine well with the characters we all know and love. With much of the movie based around teaching viewers life lessons (how very anime like), Boruto: Naruto the Movie explores themes of family, adulthood, teamwork and perseverance that will ultimately leave fans of the anime with that warm tingly feeling on the inside.


The path to ‘cool’

Boruto: Naruto the Movie can be looked at being broken into two distinct acts. First and foremost we are introduced to Boruto, the son of Naruto Uzumaki and Hinata Hyuga. Now a ninja in training, Boruto struggles to be the son and ninja everyone, including Naruto, expects him to be. With Naruto always busy, Boruto is unguided and like to take the easy way out of things – traits not too different from young Naruto.

As he trains, Boruto runs into Sauske Uchiha, an old rival and friend of Naruto. An instant idol to Boruto, Sasuke agrees to mentor him in an attempt to pull him away from the quick and easy path of modern ‘Ninja technology’ towards the one both himself and Naruto walked – the path of teamwork and perseverance to attain true power and greatness.

After training with Sasuke and learning the tough way that Naruto really does love him, Boruto, Sauske and the Kage must fight the overarching villains of the movie, Momoshiki and Kinshiki who, long story short, want to capture the tailed beasts for their power – yes, its that old plot point again. I’m guessing you know how the story will wrap up, it is a Naruto movie after all, but by the end both Boruto and Naruto learn valuable lessons about each other that changes their views on life and family forever.

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Meet the next generation

The beauty of fan service

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It’s moments like this that make it all worthwhile

The movie suffers from some seriously forgettable villains who bring absolutely nothing new to the table (even their powers are similar to things that fans of the series have all seen before), they serve as plot points to bring in some great moments. If you’re a fan of the series you will love seeing not only your old favourites, but all of their children too! From Boruto and Himawari (son and daughter of Naruto and Hinata) to Sarada (daughter of Sasuske and Sakura) and Mitsuki (son of…well… stay after the credits to find out this one) plus a ton more, you can’t help but get that warm tingly feeling inside watching the next generation of heroes interact with the old.

Though the earlier portion of the movie is largely introduction based and I could definitely see the average viewer getting annoyed at the plot pacing, the movie doesn’t make it overtly obvious. Instead of progressing the story equally, it spends a large amount of time establishing that Boruto as a character who is angry at his dad and likes to take the easy way in life – time I believe could have been better spent developing its core messages and character developments. Overall, I can forgive the movie for this as it quickly picks up the pace in the second half with great action sequences along with some solid voice acting, soundtracks and sound effects. There was the occasional case of an oddly loud sound effect or two that felt jarring, but when it is followed up by seeing Sasuke and Naruto form an armored Kyubi – it can be forgiven.


All’s well that ends well

Though Boruto: Naruto the Movie may suffer from the typical symptoms of anime feature films, it is a movie I highly enjoyed. As a long time fan of the Naruto franchise, it was a treat seeing everyone all grown up. Seeing their character traits passed down through to the next generation was like seeing a old friends again and seeing them adjust to parenthood was an added element of character development not found previously. In retrospect, the movie was just as much about the past generation as it was Boruto and the new.

If you are an anime fan but not familiar with Naruto, this may not be the place to start as it is a movie heavily based on knowledge of the series. However there are some AMAZING action scenes and the messages of parenthood and family are universal, so if you have even a mild interest I suggest watching it. Who knows, you might even come out with a new appreciation for your own family.

On the flip side, if you already are a fan of Naruto (like myself), I without a doubt say Boruto: Naruto the Movie is a must see. You will definitely find something in it to enjoy among the excellent action, familiar characters and a sea of fan service – I’m sure some of you may even get teary! On the scale of Naruto feature films, this may be the best one yet.

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Like father like son

A big thank you goes out to Madman for getting this into Australian cinemas. It was a great movie made even better by being able to see it on the big screen!

 

 

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Richard Hoskins


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